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on the mileage stickers on cars. it improves our energy efficiency. that's a good thing. that is spurring growth. but the kind of reforms we have on wall street have not solved the problem. look at what happened last week's at usb, not only wild and irresponsible behavior, but then we have attorney general holder determining that he general holderubs the fullest -- attorney general holders a betty cannot prosecute ubs because he is afraid ubs is too big to shut down and would destroy financial markets. i thought dodd-frank was supposed to fix that. what was so disconcerting was the democrats did not join senator grassley in their u.n outcry about that protect the integrity of financial markets. it is something that should be bipartisan. but it is not, apparently. that is an example of regulation cannot afford. not all it is it is expensive, it's keeping people from getting loans, and it is impeding economic growth, which we need to pay for that column i talked about. host: on twitter -- guest: it is not. it is something people gravitate to because they use a rhetorical device to say there's a wa
commissions or other groups, you mentioned the energy air force base. during the reagan administration, a great big commission that found a solution for social security, these were big public fora where discussions were held with the public and now everything seems to be happening behind closed doors. why could openness happened in years past and today we can not seem to get to deal? >> in large measure because the media has so changed. in those days, you did not have 24-hour coverage. what you find with 24-hour coverage if an idea services, at -- surfaces, at 10:00 a.m., it is dead by 2:00 p.m. because everybody goes to the cameras. the cameras are there. ever-present and wanting to hype something. before you debate it is dead. you really see that around here. >> there has been a fair bit of criticism of the president for not embracing the findings of that commission. what is your take? >> i advised the president not to embrace the specifics because i feared if he did, house republicans would automatically be in opposition. if you are part of the bowles- simpson commission you saw
you. host: joshua gordon, what in the year energy issues are we looking at? -- >> end of the year energy issues are we looking at? guest: i am not aware of any major ones for the fiscal cliff. going down the road, and you definitely have some issues. there is the need for a new highway bill. they have had trouble passing highly legislation because no one is willing to increase the gas tax. our gas taxes are the main way we pay for the new roads and bridges and that kind of thing. i think it is a relatively short-term problem. long term, we're going to need revenue to solve our future fiscal burden. one of the most sensible places to raise revenue would be through a carbon tax or something similar. that can also help to reorient our energy priorities to cleaner types of energy. host: i want to note that you can go to the c-span fiscal cliff website to get the latest information. you should be checking back over the next 48 hours as things develop. guest: 8 the deadline this afternoon. the senate has set a self- imposed deadline for 3:00. host: is that senator reid's plan b? guest:
again, i want to thank representative poe for the extraordinary effort and energy he's put into this bill and the way he's worked cooperatively with all of us on both sides of the aisle and madam speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the chair will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the nat has passed without amendment h.r. 3641, cited as the national park act. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. >> i have no fufert speakers and reserve the balance -- mr. chaffetz: i have no further speakers and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from the district of columbia. ms. norton: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. mr. chaffetz: i would like to thank representative poe for introducin
a month. i am trying to go back to cornell to do sustainable energy. we are in a double down on reaganomics in despite. jimmy carter had great inflation because for five years we were a peaceful country again. then reagan put us back into the largest military buildup in peacetime. i think that's what we ought to do is realize that did not work, just like some of the new deal stuff was not working correctly. what we have to do is c- span.org [indiscernible] i want to thank mr. richard delver of the department of transportation, because unlike michael bloomberg -- host: you have gone a little bit off track, but we appreciate your comments this morning. you can see his picture on your screen. and from the new york times business section -- and from "usa today" -- that the lead this morning in "usa today." coming up, steve forbes will be here in 45 minutes to take your calls regarding issues in washington, including what we just talked about. next is lawrence yun of the national association of realtors to talk about the real estate market and how the fiscal cliff could affect it.
was an engineer with a passion to try a lot of new stuff and i have a lot of energy. i hired people because i could not do myself what i wanted to do, and so i had employees. and i respected the work that they did because i gave them good salaries and the very best dental and health insurance, better than lockheed. and i never thought that i was there to grow a business or to make a profit. in fact, the number one thing -- and i always said that even to those who held stock in my company -- the number one thing, the biggest priority for my employees was to have fun. i enjoyed the accomplishment of breakthroughs and the fun of a first applied. and everyone who worked for me deserved to have that enjoyment. the second priority was the families of the employees have fun. that is why we provided good salaries and good health care and so on. the third priority, no cutting to make a profit. it is tough to say that to a stockholder or a board member. but every company i have ever seen go bankrupt, they started having fun -- they stop having fun before that. when people have fun, they will work like.
that the department of energy or the department of education and the number of employees they have. we do not need all that. they can cut the number of employees in half and we would have real savings. nobody will address these issues. i'll hang up. guest: when you have a budget in washington, it is hard to cut back politically. if you do, people say you are against the were the goal. this worthy goal, that worthy goal. there was a british historian in the 1950's. after world war i, britain had the largest navy in the world and they reduced the size of the navy. the laid-off sailors and dock workers. the agency running the navy was getting bigger as the navy was getting smaller. he made the discovery -- the size of a bureaucracy has nothing to do with the amount of work the bureaucracy does. it will grow unless it is reined in. the bureaucracy was getting bigger. if you get that kind of bloat, get in trouble and you change or go out of business. ronald reagan said the closest thing to immortality is a government agency. caller: good morning, everybody. do you think capitalism and privatizing is withdr
constituents in the virgin islands need relief from the highest energy cost in the country and a fair medicaid match so everyone can have access to quality health care. whatever partisan differences we have and the republicans have with our president, let's set them aside in this difficult year comes to a close an work together to give our constituents a happy new year. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from texas rise? without objection. ms. johnson: madam speaker, i rise today to implore the house g.o.p. leadership to address the looming fiscal cliff. we have only a few hours left and we owe it to the american people to find a solution. pass legislation and send it to the president for his signature tonight. there's too much at stake to let this critical situation devolve into the same politics as usual. that we have seen throughout this congress. the consequences of failure inaction are dire. according to the congressional budget office, going over the cliff would raise unemployment rate from 7.9 to 9.1% in 2013. we wou
to even more family farms and small businesses. more american energy means more american jobs. unfortunately, energy projects are being held back by federal obstacles of all kinds. republicans hope to work across the aisle to solve these and other critical challenges facing america in the new year. dividing government is a good time to solve our problems. in the next few days, leaders in washington have an important responsibility to work together and do just that. unless congress and the president act immediately, every american will be forced to pay for the largest tax hike in our nation's history on january 1. at the same time, the federal government, including our armed forces and defense workers, will undergo deep, across the board budgetary cuts. these are the cuts that president obama promised during the campaign would never take effect. well we need to reduce spending, we can do it in a much smarter, more targeted way. going over the so-called fiscal cliff will lead to devastating job losses, at a time when american families and small business owners are still struggli
felt i had to be there every day to observe ronald reagan. i was still covering the energy crisis and three mile island and other things. >> on tv news, there is so much attention to what women on tv where and what they look like. is that still true? >> there was an article. >> i saw that article. >> there was a story recently about what women anchors are wearing. it was only about women. >> it seemed a little silly. i think the exciting thing is we're covering major beats, we have women in very important roles. we now have women executive producers. s runningice president group the broadcasts and making decisions. >> you do not feel that women get promoted on tv for looks? >> i am sure in some cases, yes. my experience has been in more than 34 years with nbc news and before that i was at 10 and 9, and was recruited from philadelphia to come here by them. had two very happy years there. nobody has ever said to me -- maybe once i was wearing something with polka dots. i thought i looked very chic. in my ear, i heard the producers say if you ever wear that again, i will murder you o
politics and legislation. it is not in our genes to put a whole bunch of energy in getting the republican party. we've not learned how to do that yet, i don't think. i like being a democrat for that reason. >> one of the things we hear from long-term members or members who are leaving is the congeniality here has changed. what is your view? >> person-to-person, you know what our elevators are like here. the public probably doesn't but we get squished and it is fun. there's humor and there is a lot of banter and people don't dislike each other, period. but you get off that elevator and it changes. when i first got here, people were -- the thing that surprised me was how polite, how respectful everybody was to everybody no matter what party you were, no matter what the issue was. it was very respectful. so you could carry on real conversations that over the years it has gotten -- it is just not. that's been a huge disappointment. >> our research shows that you are spoken on the floor, given 400-plus speeches. >> almost 450. >> in the house of representatives, why do you use that platform an
: this follow-up -- if you are poor, you'd have to spend a lot of energy to get enough to beat. john, connecticut. good morning. caller: good morning. i was calling to mention low- quality food and the cost of health care, but you covered well. do you think it would be more beneficial if they start doing a local farming program where they could start growing vegetables? maybe have some land with tiles and chickens, and local people could work on the farming areas and return the food to the communities as opposed to being so reliant on high-salt diets, the foods we would coin as having a long shelf life, leaving it on the shelf for six months without going bad? has the government been able to look into those programs, considering the finances involved in the program as a whole? host: thank you. a related topic -- the availability of this fresh produce is a big distraction for many. guest: there are some programs that speak directly to the point, one our farms-to-school programs, directed to help know where food is coming from and getting fresher food into the schools. in addition, we
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)